Weekend Link Roundup

April 14, 2017

▪ Happy long weekend! I am not a religious person, but I am also not going to turn down an opportunity to bake bunny-shaped cookies (I bought my Miffy cookie cutter and stamp off eBay), and buy Sour Patch Bunnies

▪ Parking minimum codes "create traffic jams, pollution and urban sprawl."

Everything is 50% off at J. Crew Factory, and clearance styles are an extra 50% off with code EXTRA50. My picks: Striped Maritime Dress, Scalloped Shift Dress, Lightweight Homespun Shirt in Boy Fit, Turtleneck Sweater, Light Indigo Shirtdress, and 4" Scallop-Hem Short.

▪ I am about two steps below Elon Musk's level of paranoia about AI, but articles like "The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI" make it difficult to imagine a future in which the human race isn't obsolete. More optimistic people think we should regard AI in the same light as a tool, or a domesticated animal, not our robot overlords. To them I SMH.

This article argues that the U.S. tax rate is not high, and suggests that people who are dissatisfied with the current rates should move.

▪ I am unsettled by the idea that modest dressing is inextricably linked to religious directives, and even more unsettled by the insinuation that modest dressing is a "trend." I don't think there is a defined standard of modesty that everyone who dresses conservatively adheres to (beyond maybe obvious ones like keeping certain clefts covered), so I am skeptical of those who speak generally, on behalf of the entire modest dressing population. Having said this, Muslim (men and) women are proving to be robust shoppers, so I can understand the growth of companies that cater to their specific needs. But I think it's important to avoid conflating modest dressing with religious contexts driven dressing.


▪ It's difficult to explain exactly how a middle class is lost, but I find this Bloomberg article's explanation of "middle-class wealth extraction" compelling. The article also mentions Phishing for Phools, which is a book that I really enjoyed (co-written by George Akerlof, whom I find accessible).

▪ I am thrilled to read that CVS has started selling Korean beauty products in some of its stores (and online). The more affordable beauty products (especially innovative ones), the merrier. 

Shop Nordstrom Rack's Clear the Rack sale and take an extra 25% off clearance styles; prices are as marked. My picks: Catherine Malandrino Porcha Faux Fur Lined Over-The-Knee Boot, Cole Haan Pebble Leather Messenger, Jessica Simpson Gennyfer Flat, Seychelles Enamour Open Toe Ghillie Flat, Free People Tatiana Beaded Swing Dress, and Cole Haan Pebble Leather Backpack.

▪ I liked this Vox piece that attempts to explain the conflict in Syria. It's important to remember that the Assad regime and ISIL are not the only two sides here. And if you like infographics, this BBC explainer is also pretty good.
 
▪ I loathe leaving ratings, be it for an Uber driver or something I just watched on Netflix. The latter's recent move to replace the five-star rating system with a thumbs up/down system is poorly received, but could a binary system work better for companies that rely on gig workers?

ASOS is running a store-wide tiered sale: take $50 off $200 with code STASH50; $70 off $250 with code STASH70; or $100 off $350 with code STASH100. Some picks: Toucan Bow Front Mini Dress, Linen Bow Detail Cut Out Skater Dress in Postcard Print, A-Line Mini Skirt with Scallop Hem, A-line Lace Mini Dress with Bow Detail, Denim Crop Jacket with Ruffle Hem in Midwash Blue, and J.O.A Off Shoulder Top In Shirt Stripe With Tie Bow Front.

▪ This is a pretty amusing article about rich people and their problems.

▪ I will let the title of this article speak for itself: "Rat tickling: A systematic review of applications, outcomes, and moderators."

▪ I conduct a few dozen interviews every year (as an alumna interviewer and also for work), and have always found in-person meetings illuminating. You notice motor or vocal tics that are less apparent on the phone, and can learn a candidate's demeanor that no email will convey. Imagine my skepticism when I clicked on this article entitled "The Utter Uselessness of Job Interviews." And the article is uncharacteristically clickbaity for the New York Times (shame on you whoever came up with this headline); the authors target "unstructured" interviews specifically, and only carried out and cited an experiment using students. And the anecdote the story started with is mostly facultative. In any case, I am unconvinced, but I really love a sensationalistic headline. 


Have a great weekend, all!

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